Skip to main content

Posts

Showing posts from October, 2011

Agile or Not: How to Get Things Done

Agile software development always felt intuitive to me. Developing software incrementally, in close collaboration with the customer is the obvious way to deal with the uncertainty inherent in both software requirements and implementation. The technical practices of automating necessary but time consuming tests, and deploying, early and often are the obvious ways to give an team the ability to evaluate the  functionality you have and to to decide if the software works as expected. And it's also important to decide if what you built still makes sense given the current environment. Agile isn't the only way that people build software, and it may not be a perfect approach, but it's one of the best ways of dealing with a system that has unknowns.
Agile software development acknowledges uncertainty. The ability of agile methods to make it very obvious very quickly when a project, or even a process, is failing makes people uncomfortable. The visibility of the failure leads to a de…

More on Being Done

Continuing the conversation from last week, Andy Singleton followed up on my post on being done with this post. Which is good as this is one of those questions that sounds simple in theory, but in practice contains some subtlety.

While I was advocating a good definition of "Done" to enable you to measure progress along a path, Andy's point seems to be that many teams don't establish enough of a path. He says:
In my opinion, most agile teams aren't doing "Test Driven Development", and they aren't doing scrum iterations where they plan everything in advance. Instead, they are doing "Release Driven Development." They focus on assembling releases, and they do a lot of planning inside the release cycle. This is probably true in more cases than not, though one could argue whether if you are not doing iterations or TDD whether you are, in fact, doing agile. But even if can concede (which I'm not sure if I am) that you can do agile without p…

Being Done

Agile New England (which used to be called the New England Agile Bazaar, and which was started by Ken Schwaber) , has this wonderful activity before the main event each month: they host Agile 101 sessions, where people who know something about agile lead a short (30 minutes) small (about 10 people) class on agile basics for those who want to learn more about some aspect of agile. From time to time I lead a session on Agile Execution, where the goal is to help people understand how to address the following questions:
How can software and other project elements be designed and delivered incrementally? What set of management and technical practices would enable this?How do you know whether your Agile project will complete on schedule? When I lead the sessions, I tend to focus on tracking, defining stories in terms of vertical slices and the importance of continuous integration and testing to making your estimates trackable. Since the classes are so small and since the attendees have diver…

Continuous Learning, Coaching, and Learning from Others

There was an article in the Boston Globe this week by Scott Kirshner: Staying Competitive in the Workplace that emphasized the importance of keeping your skills up to date.

It's a short article and worth a read. Some of the activities Kirshner suggests are similar to those Atul Gawande makes in the appendix of his book Better: A Surgeon's Notes on Performance.

Related to this theme is a New Yorker article by Gawande, Personal Best,  on the advantages of challenges of engaging someone to coach you in your profession. I continue to be amazed at how much I'm learning from Gawande, a surgeon, about how to be a better software engineer. I suspect that I first realized this when I started learning about Patterns. (The short post, The Pattern Technology of Christopher Alexander by Michael Mehaffy and Nikos Salingaros discusses how an architect influences the software development community.)

Maybe the common theme of all these writings is that it's important to be ready to lear…

SSQ Article on SCM and Tools

I recently was interviewed for an article  on SCM and Tools that Crystal Bedell wrote for Search Software Quality. Updating tools and processes key to overcoming SCM challenges is brief, and makes some good points about the relative value of tools compared to understanding what you are trying to accomplish with your process.


The best SCM tool, from a day-to-day perspective is the one that is the most invisible to developers, and the best tool really can't help you much if you have a process that just makes it hard to collaborate. This article was also validation that trying to be too agnostic when Brad Appleton and I wrote the SCM Patterns book was a good idea. While some tools make some practices easier, a tool can't replace having an understanding of the reasons to use (or more important, not use) techniques.

Read the article, and if you want to learn some basic SCM practices read the book. For those who want a very comprehensive discussion of branching (which seems to be, f…