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Showing posts from June, 2009

3 Books every engineer should read

There are many excellent books to read if you write software (Software Configuration Management Patterns: Effective Teamwork, Practical Integration) among them :) ). Given that each of us have limited time, its difficult to read everything one might want to, so we tend to focus on reading material that addresses our immediate problems. Having said that, there are 3 books by Jerry Weinberg that have incredibly valuable advice that I use frequently, and I'd like to recommend them to anyone who's serious about software engineering work:
Are Your Lights On?: How to Figure Out What the Problem Really IsBecoming a Technical Leader: An Organic Problem-Solving ApproachSecrets of Consulting: A Guide to Giving and Getting Advice SuccessfullyThese books are more about working effectively with people to solve technical problems than actual technology problems. This is an area many people neglect; tools and technologies come and go, and you need to maintain your skill level, but knowing how…

Feeback, Writers Workshop Style

I was fortunate enough to participate in the first few Pattern Languages of Programs conferences, where I learned quite a bit about technology, writing, problem solving, and giving and receiving feedback. What made the biggest impression on me was the process the patterns workshops used.

Before I started to write patterns, I was used to getting feedback in a way that focused on what was wrong or missing in my presentation. The patterns community approach is to evaluate papers through a shepherding process that ends in a writers workshop.

A patterns writers workshop has the following parts:
The author of a paper reads a selection. This gives the other participants a chance to understand something about how what the author thinks is most important about the paper. After this reading the author becomes a passive participant in the session, only speaking if someone makes comment that isn't clear. The author does not defend his writing.Someone in the workshop summarizes the paper. This al…

The Value of Agile Infrastructure

Engineering practices such as Continuous Integration, Refactoring, and Unit Testing are key to the success of agile projects, and you need to develop and maintain some infrastructure maintain these engineering practices. Some teams struggle with how to fit work that supports agile infrastructure into an agile planning process.

One approach is to create "infrastructure" or "technical" stories for tasks that are not directly tied to product features. In these stories the stakeholder may be a developer. For example, a user story for setting up a continuous integration server can go something like:

As a developer I can ensure that all the code integrates without errors so that I can make steady progress.
While there not all work on a project leads directly to a user-visible feature, thinking of infrastructure stories differently than other stories has a number of risks, and can compromise the relationship between the development team and other stakeholders. Agile met…

Pitching Agile and the Elevator Test

Some time ago I read Crossing the Chasm by Geoffrey Moore, which is about marketing high tech products to mainstream customers. The part of the book that stuck with me, and the one that has the most pages marked in my copy was the section on positioning a product, in particular the section on the elevator test, which I've found to be a useful framework for understanding the value of many things, not just high tech products and companies.

A successful 2 sentence statement of the value of product should pass the elevator test . While the book is focused on making a claim for getting the interest of investors, being able to cast any idea you are trying to sell into this format is a great exercise, as it forces you to be focused and to really understand the value to your audience of the idea you are describing. Once you've got someone interested you can then go into the nuances.

In an elevator pitch you should be able to describe:
Your target audienceThe market alternativeThe new …